The Austrian renewables share

In 2007, 42.7 TWh of electricity were generated from renewable sources in Austria. This makes for a renewables share of 60.4%. Hydropower accounts for the lion’s share of renewable generation. The supported “other” renewable sources, excluding small hydro, only made for 0.85% in total electricity output; supported PV generation amounted to 0.03%.

The Austrian renewables mix, 2007
  TWh Share in electricity consumption Share in electricity consumption
Electricity consumption 336.7   100%
Total electricity consumption 70.7 100% 21%
Total output from renewables 42.7 60.40% 13%
Hydropower 36.8 52.05 %  
Wind 2.0 2.83%  
Supported biomass 1.6 2.26%  
Supported “other” renewables 0.6 0.85%  
of these, PV 0.02 0.03%  
Non-supported “other” renewables 1.5 2.12%  
Source: E-Control


Supported renewables supply to consumers from the public grid

The table below shows the share of supported green energy assigned to Austrian suppliers by the green power settlement responsible OeMAG. In 2008, this was 9.7% of all electricity supplied to consumers from the public grid (2007: 10.5%).

Renewable infeed and share of supported renewables in Austria, 2008 and 2007
Energy source Infeed, 2008, GWh Supported renewables*, 2008 Infeed, 2007, GWh Supported renewables*, 2007
Supported small hydro 945 1.7% 1,527 2.8%
Other renewable generating stations 4,496 8.0% 4,230 7.7%
Wind 1,988 3.6% 2,019 3.7%
Solid biomass 1,900 3.4% 1,631 3.0%
Biogas 503 0.9% 440 0.8%
Liquid biomass 36 0.1% 71 0.1%
PV 17 0.0% 15 0.0%
Landfill and sewage gas 50 0.1% 52 0.1%
Geothermal energy 2 0.0% 2 0.0%
Total small hydro and other 5,440 9.7% 5,757 10.5%
* Share of injections in total supplies to consumers from the public grid
February 2009; source: OeMAG

Supported renewable generating stations in Austria

Section 7 of the Ökostromgesetz (Green Electricity Act) defines accredited green power plants as

“Electricity generating installations using only renewable energy sources shall, upon application by their operators, be recognised as eco-energy installations by decision of the State Governor of the Federal State where the respective plant is located.”

E-Control registers all these plants in a database, which enables us to run statistical analyses and document developments. We can also draw up forecasts on this basis. However, we do not know how many of these accredited stations actually ever start operating.

We compile an annual green electricity report with details about the supported and accredited green power stations in Austria. For instance, we conduct analyses based on the stations’ technologies, locations in different Austrian provinces, load curves etc. The report is available for download from our German pages.

 

The tables below list the number of accredited renewable generating stations in Austria and the number of these stations which have been contracted by the green power settlement responsible OeMAG (i.e. the ones that receive feed-in tariffs).

Accredited stations
Energy source Number Capacity*
Biogas 344 92.1
Solid biomass 181 407.9
Liquid biomass 90 26.2
Landfill and sewage gas 64 29.2
Geothermal energy 2 0.9
PV 6,633 48.5
Wind 190 1,047.8
Total “other” renewable stations 7,504 1,652.6
Small hydro (<10 MW) 2,601 1,179.3
Total “other” and small hydro stations 10,105 2,831.9
* This is the maximum capacity. It refers to the greatest possible continuous electricity output of the entire generating installation, including all machine sets, as limited by the lowest-output component. Some of the accredited stations have not yet been built. As of March 2009; sources: E-Control and OeMAG
 
Number of generating stations under contract to OeMAG
Energy source Number Capacity*
Biogas 293 76.2
Solid biomass 113 311.7
Liquid biomass 47 14.5
Landfill and sewage gas 45 21.2
Geothermal energy 2 0.9
PV 3,112 21.7
Wind 134 960.9
Total “other” renewable stations 3,746 1,407.1
Small hydro (<10 MW) 1,305 124.7
Total “other” and small hydro stations 5,051 1,531.8
* This is the maximum capacity. It refers to the greatest possible continuous electricity output of the entire generating installation, including all machine sets, as limited by the lowest-output component. As of March 2009; sources: E-Control and OeMAG